Surrey Place serves people of all ages with developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorder. In each of these cases, we work with people who have varying and sometimes complex needs. To meet our clients’ needs, we take a community and family-based approach to establish solutions that work, and together, we create responsive and innovative plans of care. In these plans, we include families, support networks, and other service providers, to be part of a caring circle of support, teaching skills and helping them learn to advocate and navigate through care.

Our expertise combined with our approach enables our clients to reimagine their potential, reach their goals, and experience meaningful change.

Compassionate, committed clinicians and therapists make a difference in the journeys of the people we serve. Approaching all we do with respect; Surrey Place seeks to understand and accept differences in a professional and caring manner. Surrey Place meets the needs of people, providing responsive, evidence-based assessments and treatments. Our expertise combined with our approach enables our clients to reimagine their potential, reach their goals, and experience meaningful change. 

As a leader in the field, we drive systemic change by facilitating transformation and embracing the future. We collaborate with partners and organizations in many disciplines to share knowledge and tools, improve access to services, and set standards. We conduct research and train the experts of the future.  

Located across the Toronto region, our five locations offer a welcoming, inclusive, and safe space where community is nourished and sustained. With over 450 staff, we are often the first point of contact for many. As the lead agency for Developmental Services Ontario Toronto Region and as a partner of Toronto Autism Services Network we are a core component of service delivery in our community and across the province.

Mission, Vision, Values

At Surrey Place, we follow these principles to ensure that we deliver high quality, consistent programming across our organization

Our Impacts

60 Years in Service

Support Across the Lifespan 

10,000+ Clients Served Annually

5 Locations in Toronto 

Our History

Surrey Place has a history of advancing new approaches to serve people with developmental disabilities. Over the years, we have laid the foundation in an evolving sector. Today, we serve over 10,000 clients, families and caregivers, professionals and organizations annually from our five satellite locations in Toronto. We are proud to have maintained our commitment to the health and well-being of our clients and communities for 59 years. 

1960s –
Our Roots Begin

1960s

In 1962, the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychiatry establishes a community clinic to provide assessment and diagnosis for individuals with developmental disabilities. 

1960s

The community clinic moves to our current head office location at 2 Surrey Place in 1966The new clinic is named the Mental Retardation Centre.   

1970s –
A New Name

1970s

Additional disciplines are introduced in 1971 including education, occupational therapy, audiology, speech pathology and genetics in addition to psychiatry, psychology, nursing and social work.   

1970s

The Centre successfully moves away from outdated language and ideas about developmental disabilities, demonstrating leadership and an investment in emerging voices and research. 

1970s

The Mental Retardation Centre is renamed Surrey Place Centre in 1974. 

1970s

Surrey Place Centre is the first organization in Canada to introduce behavioural therapy services. 

1970s

Ontario’s first early intervention service for infants with developmental delays is launched at 2 Surrey Place.  

1980s –
Ontario Government’s Commitment

1980s

The Parenting Enhancement Program launches, providing parents with developmental disabilities with skills training. 

1980s

The provincial government divests the organization’s services and a community board and foundation assume responsibility in 1987. 

1980s

Surrey Place Centre establishes a clinic for people with Down syndrome to screen for medical complications over the life span, the first of its kind in Canada. 

1990s –
Quality of Life Conference

1990s

Surrey Place Centre is a lead organization on the International Family Quality of Life Project, examining the lived experiences of families with member(s) with an intellectual or developmental disability in collaboration with researchers from Australia, Israel and Canada. 

2000s –
Service Growth

2000s 

New services are introduced to support additional diagnoses including the Behavioural Medical Assessment of Complex Kids & their Environment Clinic (BMACKE), and two clinics for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) diagnosis and assessment for children and adults.  

2000s 

Mashkikiiwininiwag Mazinaatesijigan Wichiiwewin (MMW) Video Conferencing Program is introduced to serve clients in Northern Ontario communities. 

2000s 

The inaugural Toronto Partnership for Autism Services is formed with Surrey Place Centre, Adventure Place, Aisling Discoveries Child and Family Centre, the Etobicoke Children’s Centre, and Geneva Centre for Autism. 

2000s 

Surrey Place Centre establishes the Family Practice Clinic with St. Michael’s Hospital. 

2000s 

Dr. Bill Sullivan creates the first Consensus Guidelines for the primary healthcare of adults. 

2000s 

Surrey Place Centre is appointed Toronto region representative for two provincial programs, Assistive Devices Program and Connections for Students, leading to the inception of Augmentative Communication and Writing Aids (ACWA) and the School Support Program. 

2010s –
Service Integrations & Partnerships

2010s

Surrey Place Centre is appointed the administrative representative for Developmental Services Ontario Toronto Region (DSO Toronto Region) in 2011. DSO Toronto Region makes it easier for adults with developmental disabilities and their families to apply for services and supports.  

2010s

Surrey Place Centre becomes co-lead in Toronto Autism ABA Services in partnership with Adventure Place, Aisling Discoveries Child and Family Centre, The Etobicoke Children’s Centre and Kerry’s Place Autism Services. 

2010s

Surrey Place Centre integrates the Ontario Foundation for Visually Impaired Children (OFVIC) into its operations in 2012, including assuming OFVIC’s Training and Development Centre for the Blind-Low Early Intervention Program across Ontario. 

2010s

In 2013, Thistletown Regional Centre TRE-ADD program officially transfers to Surrey Place Centre. 

2010s

Partners with The Hospital for Sick Children, Circle 21 and the Sick Kids Foundation in 2014 to establish the SickKids Down Syndrome Clinic, a program that provides children ages 0-4 with a diagnosis of Down Syndrome with access to information and services. 

2010s

Partners with Conseil scolaire Viamonde and Conseil scolaire de district Catholique Centre-Sud to create French Language Service. 

2010s

The Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) Psychiatric Clinic is launched in 2015. The Enhanced Clinic Service model is introduced in 2016 to improve access and responsiveness to client needs. 

2010s

In 2016, Surrey Place partners with Developmental Services Ontario Toronto Region, the City of Toronto, Inner City Family Health Centre and Community Living Toronto to establish permanent housing for 25 homeless men with developmental disabilities. 

2010s

Establishes formal partnership in behaviour therapy with Sick Kids Hospital, Griffin Centre and East Metro Youth Services in 2016 

2010s

The Infancy & Early Childhood program establishes a Behavioural Consultation Clinic and a Family Counseling Clinic 

2010s

The Mobile Adult Psychiatric Team launches in January 2016 to go into communities and assess and support individuals with intellectual disabilities who are aging and experiencing mental health challenges. 

2010s

Surrey Place Centre launches a new brand identity and changes its name to Surrey Place in 2018. The new brand represents the organization’s growth and continued commitment to serve clients in an accessible and welcoming manner. 

2010s

The Developmental Disabilities Primary Care Program launches with dedicated annualized funding to update practice guidelines and tools, and to build capacity to care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 

2010s

With assistance from Women’s Xchange 15k Challenge grant, Surrey Place conducts an intervention study in 2019 for mothers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, surveying screening rates for both cervical and breast cancer. The study contributes to studies used by leading research bodies in Canada and internationally. 

2020s –
New Horizons

2020s

In 2020, Surrey Place began working with Ontario Health Teams to create new partnerships and build a health care system that fully supports people with developmental disabilities in the hospital and community by sharing strategies and knowledge about their unique needs. 

2020s

Surrey Place launches the Transitions Team in 2020 to support complex life transitions through customizable, interdisciplinary paid services. It’s designed to help external agencies support individuals with developmental disabilities transition and their families and caregivers. 

2020s

In 2021, the new Toronto Autism Services Network launches in partnership with Surrey Place, Geneva Centre for Autism, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Kerry’s Place Autism Services, Lumenus Community Services, Strides Toronto and SAAAC Autism Centre. 

By 2 months

Has your baby had their hearing screened? YES NO

By 6 months

Does the child?

Startle in response to loud noises? YES NO
Turn to where a sound is coming from? YES NO
Make different cries for different needs (hungry, tired)? YES NO
Watch your face as you talk? YES NO
Smile/laugh in response to your smiles and laughs? YES NO
Imitate coughs or other sounds such as ah, eh, buh YES NO

By 9 months

Does the child?

Respond to their name? YES NO
Respond to the telephone ringing or a knock at the door? YES NO
Understand being told no? YES NO
Get what they want through using gestures (reaching to be picked up)? YES NO
Play social games with you (Peek-a-Boo)? YES NO
Enjoy being around people? YES NO
Babble and repeat sounds such as babababa or duhduhduh? YES NO

By 12 months

Does the child?

Follow simple one-step directions (sit down)? YES NO
Look across the room to a toy when adult points at it? YES NO
Consistently use three to five words? YES NO
Use gestures to communicate (waves hi/bye, shakes head for no)? YES NO
Get your attention using sounds, gestures and pointing while looking at your eyes? YES NO
Bring you toys to show you? YES NO
Perform for social attention and praise? YES NO
Combine lots of sounds together as though talking (abada baduh abee)? YES NO
Show an interest in simple picture books? YES NO

By 18 months

Does the child?

Understand the meaning of in and out, off and on? YES NO
Point to more than 2 body parts when asked? YES NO
Use at least 20 words consistently? YES NO
Respond with words or gestures to simple questions (Where's teddy? What's that?)? YES NO
Demonstrate some pretend play with toys (gives teddy bear a drink, pretends a bowl is a hat)? YES NO
Make at least four different consonant sounds (p ,b, m, n, d, g, w, h)? YES NO
Enjoy being read to and sharing simple books with you? YES NO
Point to pictures using one finger? YES NO

By 2 years

Does the child?

Follow two-step directions (Go find your teddy bear and show it to Grandma.)? YES NO
Use 100 to 150 words? YES NO
Use at least two pronouns (you, me, mine)? YES NO
Consistently combine two to four words in short phrases (Daddy hat. Truck go down.)? YES NO
Enjoy being around other children? YES NO
Begin to offer toys to other children and imitate other children's actions and words? YES NO
Use words that are understood by others 50 to 60 per cent of the time? YES NO
Form words or sounds easily and without effort? YES NO
Hold books the right way up and turn the pages? YES NO
Read to stuffed animals or toys? YES NO
Scribble with crayons? YES NO

By 30 months

Does the child?

Understand the concepts of size (big/little) and quantity (a little/a lot, more)? YES NO
Use some adult grammar (two cookies, bird flying, I jumped)? YES NO
Use over 350 words? YES NO
Use action words such as run, spill, fall? YES NO
Participate in some turn-taking activities with peers, using both words and toys? YES NO
Demonstrate concern when another child is hurt or sad? YES NO
Combine several actions in play (puts blocks in the train and drives the train, drops the blocks off.)? YES NO
Put sounds at the beginning of most words? YES NO
Use words with two or more syllables or beats (ba-na-na, com-pu-ter, a-pple)? YES NO
Recognize familiar logos and signs involving print (Stop sign)? YES NO
Remember and understand familiar stories? YES NO

By 3 years

Does the child?

Understand who, what, where and why questions? YES NO
Create long sentences using five to eight words? YES NO
Talk about past events (trip to grandparents house, day at child care)? YES NO
Tell simple stories? YES NO
Show affection for favourite playmates? YES NO
Engage in multi-step pretend play (pretending to cook a meal, repair a car)? YES NO
Talk in a way that most people outside of the family understand what she/he is saying most of the time? YES NO
Have an understanding of the function of print (menus, lists, signs)? YES NO
Show interest in, and awareness of, rhyming words? YES NO
Read to stuffed animals or toys? YES NO
Scribble with crayons? YES NO

By 4 years

Does the child?

Follow directions involving three or more steps (First get some paper, then draw a picture and give it to Mommy)? YES NO
Use adult type grammar? YES NO
Tell stories with a beginning, middle and end? YES NO
Talk to try and solve problems with adults and with other children? YES NO
Show increasingly complex imaginary play? YES NO
Talk in a way that is understood by strangers almost all the time? YES NO
Generate simple rhymes (cat-bat)? YES NO
Match some letters with their sounds (letter b says buh, letter t says tuh)? YES NO